Integrity Council’s Core Carbon Principles

Integrity Council’s Core Carbon Principles

Sam Hope

5 years: Carbon Markets

The Integrity Council for the Voluntary Carbon Market (ICVCM) has published its Core Carbon Principles (CCPs). Join Sam Hope as he talks us through each principle.

The Integrity Council for the Voluntary Carbon Market (ICVCM) has published its Core Carbon Principles (CCPs). Join Sam Hope as he talks us through each principle.

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Integrity Council’s Core Carbon Principles

7 mins 40 secs

Overview

The Integrity Council for the Voluntary Carbon Market (ICVCM) has published its Core Carbon Principles (CCPs). The CCPs are a global benchmark for high-integrity carbon credits that meet rigorous thresholds on disclosure and sustainable development. They provide a credible means of identifying carbon credits that create real, measurable climate impacts. The 10 CCPs are categorised under three key areas: governance, emission impact and sustainable development.

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand the Core Carbon Principles (CCPs)

  • Outline how the CCPs make a high-integrity carbon credit

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Summary
What are the Core Carbon Principles (CCPs)? 
The CCPs are a global benchmark for high-integrity carbon credits that meet rigorous thresholds on disclosure and sustainable development. The CCPs provide a credible means of identifying carbon credits that create real, measurable climate impacts. The CCPs are implemented through an Assessment Framework. The framework first defines which carbon-crediting programs are CCP-Eligible, then identifies CCP-Approved project categories, before finally seeing CCP-Labelled credits. 

What are the 10 Core Carbon Principles? 

The 10 CCPs are categorised under three key areas: governance, emission impact and sustainable development.

Governance
– Effective governance 
The carbon-crediting program shall have effective program governance to ensure accountability in the way they operate. 
 
– Tracking 
The carbon-crediting program shall operate or make use of a registry to uniquely identify, record and track mitigation activities, as well as carbon credit issuance and retirement.
 
– Transparency 
The carbon-crediting program shall provide comprehensive, transparent and publicly available information on all credited mitigation activities.
 
– Robust independent third-party validation and verification 
The carbon-crediting program shall have requirements for robust, independent validation and verification of project activities by a third party.
 
Emissions impact
– Additionality
The greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions or removals from the mitigation activity shall be additional. This means that they would not have occurred in the absence of the incentive or support created by carbon credit revenues.  
 
– Permanence
The GHG emission reductions or removals from the mitigation activity shall be permanent or, where there is a risk of reversal, there shall be measures in place to address those risks and compensate reversals, such as with activity buffer zones.
 
– Robust quantification of emission reductions and removals
The GHG emission reductions or removals from the mitigation activity shall be robustly quantified, based on conservative approaches and scientific methods.  
 
– No double counting
The GHG emission reductions or removals from the mitigation activity shall only be counted once towards achieving mitigation targets or goals.
 
Sustainable development
– Sustainable development benefits and safeguards
The carbon-crediting program shall have clear guidance, tools and compliance procedures to ensure mitigation activities conform with social and environmental safeguards, and deliver positive sustainable development impacts. 
 
– Contribution toward net zero transition
The mitigation activity shall avoid locking in levels of greenhouse gas emissions, technologies or carbon-intensive practices that are incompatible with the objective of achieving net zero emissions by mid-century. 

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Sam Hope

Sam Hope

Sam Hope is the Senior Carbon Advisor at Plannet Zero, a tech company dedicated to developing smart carbon footprinting software for SMEs. He joins from Redshaw Advisors, an advisory firm that will help organisations clearly understand the assignment of net zero.

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