Solutions to Wildlife Trafficking

Solutions to Wildlife Trafficking

Adams Cassinga

15 years: Wildlife Activist

So what are some practical ways we can tackle wildlife trafficking, globally and as an individual? And what can we take away from this problem? Join Adams Cassinga as he explores these questions.

So what are some practical ways we can tackle wildlife trafficking, globally and as an individual? And what can we take away from this problem? Join Adams Cassinga as he explores these questions.

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Solutions to Wildlife Trafficking

12 mins 16 secs

Overview

There must be acknowledgement that wildlife trafficking is a global problem - not limited to just Africa and Asia. Individuals can help by donating to local zoos and non-profits. But there will be a cultural reset needed - for example, not promoting or engaging with problematic social media posts. This will require everyone to educate themselves.

Key learning objectives:

  • Outline solutions to tackling wildlife trafficking

  • Understand the cultural importance of stopping wildlife trafficking

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Summary
What are some solutions to tackling wildlife trafficking? 
We all bear responsibility towards nature and conservation. Individuals can start small by donating to local zoos and non-profits. But the largest impact will involve education. This can mean not engaging with social media posts where people are showing off their 'pets' (such as chimpanzees or big cats). It will also involve acknowledging that wildlife trafficking is a global problem - not limited to just Africa and Asia. 

What is the cultural significance of stopping poaching and wildlife trafficking? 
Sub-Saharan African countries are subdivided into tribes, with each tribe subdivided into clans. Each clan will have a totem - an animal which represents their heritage (for example, a leopard, a gorilla or a pangolin). Out of respect to their culture and ancestors, many people will choose not eat a certain animal, who are believed to be reincarnated ancestors. However today, people forced to go against their beliefs and culture due to poverty, ignorance and greed. Wildlife trafficking is stripping many people of their dignity. 

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Adams Cassinga

Adams Cassinga

Adams Cassinga, a wildlife activist and honorary park ranger of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, works for Conserve Congo, a nonprofit organisation in Central Africa focusing on combating wildlife trafficking. As a wildlife criminal investigator, he also serves as a park ranger in the DRC.

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