What Does Good Feedback Look Like?

What Does Good Feedback Look Like?

Margaret Cheng

35 years: Writer & HR Consultant

Giving feedback doesn’t have to be a painful experience. Join Margaret Cheng as she outlines how to give good feedback using the FORCES model.

Giving feedback doesn’t have to be a painful experience. Join Margaret Cheng as she outlines how to give good feedback using the FORCES model.

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What Does Good Feedback Look Like?

8 mins 54 secs

Overview

Feedback takes you away from your inner view of yourself and forces you to realise that other people see you differently. The stress response caused by this makes our brains leap into fight or flight mode, flooding us with adrenaline. If you want to give good feedback, you should remember the FORCES model: good feedback is always Forward looking, Owned, Regular, Clear, Enabling and Specific

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand why receiving feedback is stressful

  • Outline the FORCES model

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Summary
Why is receiving feedback stressful? 
Feedback takes you away from your inner view of yourself and forces you to realise that other people see you differently. This causes a stress response. Your brain leaps into its fight or flight state, flooding you with adrenaline. As a result, you will be unable to listen to whatever the person offering the feedback has to say and too busy trying to run away.

What is the FORCES model of good feedback? 
  • Forward looking - Not looking back to apportion blame but thinking about development for the future. 
  • Owned - Offering your view about the impact of a particular behaviour that you have observed. 
  • Regular - They should be conversations you have all the time to make it a normal part of working life. 
  • Clear - Taking people constructively through your helpful, examples of observed behaviour and the impact of the behaviours on the work/you/the team. 
  • Enabling -  So the person can learn and move forward. 
  • Specific - Feedback is always so much easier when it refers to something specific e.g.  examples of the behaviours you are giving feedback about. 

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Margaret Cheng

Margaret Cheng

Margaret Cheng, a freelance writer, HR consultant, and executive coach, has spent the last year researching and writing a book, "Giving Good Feedback." With 30 years of experience in various sectors, including retail, financial services, consultancies, and charities, she has written on business-related topics for HR, outplacement, and career coaching consultancies and CIPD magazine. She will be incorporating her experience and book into her videos to discuss feedback and its potential for professional development and learning.

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